So what’s in a profile?

Most of Logan Connections consists of “profiles” of individuals or couples and their families. So, what’s a “profile”?

A profile in Logan Connections is an outline of a person or couple from the earliest we know about them until the last we know: usually where they died and are buried. A typical profile averages 4-7 pages. If someone died young, a profile may be only a page or two. But some are much more detailed and lengthy. On people who lived a long time ago, profiles are dependent on what information we may have, of course. But I’ve tried to craft profiles so descendants and relatives can get a feel of what their life was like at a certain time and place. One profile may have a lot of information about a person’s religion and occupation. Another might include military information. Some have interesting land and tax records. Others have detailed estate records which let us see what life was really like for people. All profiles include spouses and children when known. The hope is that a profile will open a window into a person’s life in some detail.

For those interested in sources and citations, and where to find more information about a person, couple, and/or family, I’ve included that in smaller print under each entry. If this isn’t your cup of tea, you can just ignore the sources and read on.

Click on the links below to see some excerpts so you can get a feel for what profiles consist of.

Drury Logan Profile Excerpt

The following is an excerpt from one of the profiles found in the Logan Connections book. It is not the full profile, but is intended as an example of the information you can find within the profiles in the book.


Enlists and serves in Revolutionary War, Tryon County, now Rutherford County, North Carolina, 1776-1781

While residing in Tryon [County at the time], [now] Rutherford County, North Carolina, [Drury Logan] enlisted in 1776, and served at various times until in 1781, about thirty-two months in all, as a private in the North Carolina Troops under Captains Harden, Abraham Kirkendol, Robert Alexander, James Gray, Vansant, Levy Johnston, William Smith and Whiteside, Colonels John Thomas and Robert Porter. He served as a guard on the frontiers against the Indians and Tories and was at the siege of Charleston where he was taken prisoner and kept on parole until after the battle of King’s Mountain: he was at the battle of Nelson’s Ferry, at the storming of Friday’s Fort, in engagements at Goose Creek and Governor’s Gate and stated that he “was the bearer of dispatches from General Sumter to General Green when he raised the siege of Ninety Six.”
Source: Pension records, National Archives and Records Administration, cover letter dated 12 July 1933 to Mrs. C.G.Young, Proctor, Arkansas
Serves as bondsman for marriage of James Dougherty and Mary Standford, Rutherford County, North Carolina, 1783
Drewry Logan and Charles Dougherty served as bondsmen for the marriage of James Dougherty and Mary Standford which occurred shortly after 29 January 1783 in Rutherford County, North Carolina.
Source: Marriages of Rutherford County, North Carolina, 1779-1868, Brent H. Holcomb, 1986; North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868, Ancestry.com
Note: The date of the marriage bond is 29 January 1783. The marriage would have taken place a few days later.

 

David T. Logan Profile Excerpt

 The following is an excerpt from one of the profiles found in the Logan Connections book. It is not the full profile, but is intended as an example of the information you can find within the profiles in the book.

Member, Captain Hiram W. Cooke’s Mounted Ranging Company, Coryell County, TX, 1861
To his Excellency Governor Clark for the State of Texas
We the undersigned citizens of Coryell County would respectfully request your Excellency to authorize Capt. Hiram W. Cooke to raise a Mounted Ranging Company. Our Citizens, or enough of them to form a Company, have horses and arms already. Capt. Cook will take pleasure in raising the company. We request that when the said Company shall have been enrolled that they be permitted to elect their own officers to be commissioned by your Excellency. The Indians are now down on the frontier and our boys are anxious to drive them away.
May 24, 1861
Members of Captain Hiram W. Cooke’s Mounted Ranging Company include “Hillery” Logan as well as his sons, James M. Logan, W.L. Logan, D.T. Logan, R.S. Logan, and W.H. Logan.
Tax list, Coryell County, Texas, 1861
Hillary Logan
Jas. Logan is the next person listed. D.T. Logan also is listed.
Inventory by D.T. Logan
Town Lot N B K $100.00
1 Poll
D.T. Logan

Caledonia Logan Profile Excerpt

The following is an excerpt from one of the profiles found in the Logan Connections book. It is not the full profile, but is intended as an example of the information you can find within the profiles in the book.


Birth of Caledonia D. Logan, daughter of Reuben Logan and Elizabeth Ingle Logan, Lincoln County, Tennessee, 1839
Caledonia D. Logan, daughter of Reuben and Elizabeth Ingle Logan, was born 9 February 1839 in Lincoln County, Tennessee.
Source: Newton County, Missouri, Historical Society, Newton County, Missouri tombstone, Ritchey Family Cemetery; “Ritchie Mansion Representative of Heritage,” Neosho Daily News, Neosho, Newton County, Missouri, 2 July 1976; Find A Grave, created by Kim Slayton, maintained by Deborah Black Phenix, photograph added by litekeeper
Notes:
”Caledonia” is the Latin name the Romans gave Scotland. Caledonia is believed to be related to a Pictish tribe, the Caledonii. After Hadrian’s Wall was built by the Romans, Caledonia was north of the wall, Britannia was south. Many people who named their girls Caledonia believed they were of Scottish ancestry.

Caledonia Logan’s father, Reuben Logan, dies, Lincoln County, Tennessee, 1845

Guardian record, Lincoln County Court, Lincoln County, Tennessee, 1846
Byas Logan guardian for Littleberry Logan, Benjamin Logan, Fanny Logan and Caldona Logan. Oct. 4, 1846.
Source: Guardian and Settlement Record, Early Unpublished Court Records of Lincoln County, Tennessee, Helen C. Marsh and Timothy R. Marsh, Southern Historical Press, 1993

Guardian record, Lincoln County Court, Lincoln County, Tennessee, 1848
Byers Logan guardian for Littleberry, Bryan F., Fanny and Caleadonia Logan, heirs of Reuben Logan, with Hardy and William Logan as administrators. Jan. 22, 1848.Byas Logan guardian for Littleberry, Benjamin F., Fanny, and Caldonia Logan. paid Littleberry Logan who has arrived at full age. Oct. 28, 1848.
Source: Guardian Settlement Book, 1847-1852, Early Unpublished Court Records of Lincoln County, Tennessee, Marsh and Marsh, ibid

Guardian record, Lincoln County Court, Lincoln County, Tennessee, 1849
Byas Logan guardian for Benjamin F., Fanny and Caledonia Logan. Oct. 28, 1849.
Source: Guardian Settlement Book, 1847-1852, Early Unpublished Court Records of Lincoln County, Tennessee, Marsh and Marsh, ibid

John Pinckney Logan Profile Excerpts

The following is an excerpt from one of the profiles found in the Logan Connections book. It is not the full profile, but is intended as an example of the information you can find within the profiles in the book. 

Works in grocery store, Yorkville, York District South Carolina, 1860
When John Pinckney Logan’s brother, David Jackson Logan, and his brother’s business partner, Samuel Banks Meacham, opened a grocery store, Logan & Meacham, in Yorkville, S.C., “Pink” or “Pinck” Logan worked there as did another brother, Leonidas Marion Logan.
Source: A Rising Star of Promise,The Civil War Odyssey of David Jackson Logan, 17th South Carolina Volunteers, 1861-1864, edited by Samuel N. Thomas, Jr. and Jason H. Silverman, 1998

Enlists in Turkey Creek Grays, 5th South Carolina Volunteers, Confederate States of America, South Carolina, 1861

“Pinck” Logan enlisted as a private in Company I, Turkey Creek Grays, 5th South Carolina Volunteers, when war broke out in 1861. P. Logan joined for duty and enrolled 13 April 1861 in Orangeburg, South Carolina, “in the service of Confederate States” and mustered 4 June 1861. His original time of service was for 12 months. A private, 21, he had dark eyes, dark hair, and dark complexion. HIs occupation before the war was clerk. He was born in Cleaveland County, N.C. The company muster roll indicates he traveled 83 miles to the rendezvous of the fledgling company from his home in Yorkville, South Carolina.
Source: A Rising Star of Promise, Thomas and Silverman, ibid; descriptive list and account of pay and clothing, National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Note: Samuel B. Meacham, brother David Jackson Logan’s business partner in the grocery store in Yorkville, enlisted 13 April 1861 with the 5th Regiment, South Carolina Volunteers. He was elected lieutenant and eventually became captain. This is the same unit in which John Pinckney Logan served. He worked in the store before the Civil War.
Source: NARA; Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume XVII, R.A. Brock, 1889; “Roll of Company E, Fifth Regiment Infantry, South Carolina Volunteers in the Confederate States Provisional Army,” Report of the Historian of the Confederate Records to the General Assembly of South Carolina, 1899

Enlists in Jasper Light Infantry, Confederate States of America, 1861
John P Logan Roll of HonorThere is also a record of “Pink Logan” enlisting in the Jasper Light Infantry in April of 1861. The roster appeared in the Yorkville Enquirer issue of 25 April 1861.
Source: “Roster of Jasper Light Infantry, April 1861,” York County Genealogical and  Historical Quarterly, March, 1990
Note: Confederate records also show “Pinckney J. Logan” as a private, Company G, Palmetto Sharpshooters. He transferred to a North Carolina regiment (unspecified in the record, but it was Co. E, 12th North Carolina.)
Source: Report of the Historian of the Confederate Records to the General Assembly of South Carolina, 1899; South Carolina Troops in Confederate Service, Vol. III, A.S. Salley, 1930

Wounded in Virginia, multiple times
John Pinckney Logan was “several times wounded — twice severely — but he continued cheerful and fearless to the day of his death.”  Company muster rolls show him present throughout 1861, but from 31 December 1861 until 1 July 1862 he was detailed to Manchester Hospital. Oftentimes, soldiers were detailed to a hospital after an illness or wound where they performed light nursing or other duties while recuperating. Company muster rolls show J.P. Logan detailed to Manchester Hospital throughout 1862 and into January and February 1863.
Source: Sketches, Historical and Biographical, of the Broad River and Kings Mountain Baptist Associations, From 1800 to 1882, Deacon J.R. Logan (John Pinckney Logan’s father), 1887; NARA

John Pinckney Logan killed at Battle of Hatcher’s Run, Virginia, 1865
John Pinckney Logan was killed at the Battle of Hatcher’s Run, near Petersburg, Virginia, 6 February 1865, “while making a charge on the enemy’s works.” He was 25. His father, John Randolph Logan, quotes the following statement by John Pinckney Logan to an unnamed fellow soldier on the morning of the battle: “I have several times been wounded, and made many hair-breadth escapes from the enemies’ bullets, but to-day I shall fall at last,’ which proved true, and was certainly a foreboding with him as to what would follow.”