Edna Florence Allen Cook: Application for membership in the Cherokee Nation (and accompanying funding), Yates Center, Woodson County, Kansas, 1906

Edna Allen Cook was the daughter of William Riley Allen and Hannah Canarissa Heape Allen. William Riley Allen was the son of Margaret Jane Logan Allen and Lewis/Louis Allen. William Logan, son of Zachariah Logan and Margaret “Peggy” Brown Logan, was Edna’s great-grandfather.

All the applications by our Logan family members were rejected.

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Application of Lucina or Lousena Wade Boswell for membership in the Eastern Cherokee Nation (and accompanying funds)

Lucina or Lousena Wade was the daughter of Lucinda F. Allen Wade and Jasper C. “Jack” Wade. Lucinda F. Allen, in turn, was the daughter of Margaret J. Logan Allen and either Joseph or Lewis/Louis Allen. (This application has Joseph; other sources have his brother, Lewis or Louis Allen. After Lewis Allen’s death, Margaret married his brother, Joseph Allen.) Lucina/Lousena married Nelson Boswell.

All of these applications based on Zachariah Logan being the Native American ancestor were rejected; however, they’re helpful as genealogical sources and as reflections of what these families believed to be true at a time before DNA testing.

Lousena Boswell and Nelson A. Boswell are buried at Borland Cemetery, Cherokee County, Kansas.

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Shared by Karra Porter

 

 

Divorce: Reuben Logan v. Sarah F. Stewart (McElhaney) Logan, Crawford County, Kansas, 1871-1872

Reuben Logan was the son of Zachariah Logan and Margaret “Peggy” Brown Logan. Reuben Logan married (first) Sarah Thackston or Thaxton in 1841 in St. Clair County, Illinois. Sarah died sometime between 1860 and 1864.

Reuben Logan then married Mrs. Sarah Stewart McElhaney in 1864 in Washington County, Illinois. Sarah Stewart McElhaney was a widow. On 21 September 1866, Reuben and Sarah had a son, Elihu Z. Logan. (We assume his middle name was Zachariah for his grandfather, Zachariah Logan.) Elihu was born in Washington County, Illinois. The blended family moved to Kansas around 1867. Only a few years after the move to Kansas, around 1870, Sarah abruptly left Reuben Logan’s household, taking sons, Charles McElhaney and Elihu Logan, with her. Sarah returned to Washington County, Illinois. She, Charles, and Elihu are enumerated there in the 1870 census. “Rubin” and his children at home by first wife, Sarah, are enumerated in Crawford County, Kansas, in the 1870 census.

Reuben Logan died 6 February 1873 in Cherokee County, Kansas, burial site unknown, but assumed to be close to Girard, Kansas. Sarah F. Stewart (McElhaney) Logan died 3 November 1895 in Oakdale, Washington County, Illinois.

The divorce papers from Crawford County, Kansas, are below. It should be noted that the papers present Reuben Logan’s side since he was the one filing. Fleeing one’s husband was one of the few recourses a woman had at the time. Sarah Stewart (McElhaney) Logan never remarried.

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The above sentence — “…the place of her residence cannot be assertained [sic] by any means….” — is a bit of a whopper since Sarah returned to Washington County where Reuben Logan still had friends, acquaintances, and relatives, including Andrew Jackson Logan, his nephew, who lived just a few households away from Sarah and her boys in Pilot Knob Township.

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When Reuben Logan died in Cherokee County, Kansas, his heirs were:

  • Lavina Guy, Oakdale, Washington County, Illinois
  • Mary Brewer, Pawnee, Bourbon County, Kansas
  • Martha Logan, Sherman City, Cherokee County, Kansas
  • Maggie Logan, Girard, Crawford County, Kansas
  • Elihu Logan, Oakdale, Washington County, Illinois
  • Malinda Logan, Sherman City, Cherokee County, Kansas
  • Wm. Logan, Sherman City, Cherokee County, Kansas
  • Jennette Logan, Sherman City, Cherokee County, Kansas

Leonard Allen: application to Bureau of Indian Affairs for funding/membership in Eastern Cherokee Nation, Cherokee County, Kansas

Leonard Allen, son of Margaret Jane Logan Allen and Lewis or Louis K. Allen, was born 2 March 1858 in Washington County, Illinois. Leonard Allen married (second) Effie L. Wright in 1898 in Cherokee County, Kansas. He applied for membership — and funding — in the Eastern Cherokee Nation in Kansas. He based this on his great-grandfather, Zachariah Logan, whom he believed to be a Native American ancestor. All of these applications by this extended family were denied membership in the Cherokee Nation. DNA and the “paper trail” don’t indicate Native American ancestry for Zachariah Logan.

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Source: Karra Porter

William Logan, Cherokee County, Kansas: Affidavit supporting son, Drury Logan’s, application for membership in the Cherokee Nation, Dawes Commission, 1896

William Logan, son of Zachariah Logan, applied for membership in the Cherokee Nation with the Dawes Commission in 1896. William Logan was 83. William made his mark for his signature, being unable to write his name. Like all our Logan family’s applications for Cherokee Nation citizenship, William Logan’s was rejected (“demurred” in the legal language of the Dawes Commission). The document which follows is William Logan’s affirmation of his son, Drury Logan’s, eligibility for Cherokee Nation membership.

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Drury Logan, Cherokee County, Kansas: Application for citizenship in the Cherokee Nation, Dawes Commission, 1896

Several members of our Logan family claimed Cherokee citizenship “by blood” through their descent from Zachariah Logan, son of Joseph Logan and Anna “Annie” Bias Logan. The commission set up to make these eligibility determinations was the Dawes Commission.

All of our Logan applicants, including Drury Logan, were denied membership in the Cherokee Nation by the Dawes Commission. It should be noted that, before DNA analysis and more exacting genealogical research standards, people often were said to have “Indian blood” if they had so-called Native American features, e.g. high cheekbones, dark hair, and dark skin. Sometimes these clues led to tribal ancestry; more often, they did not. Many people from many ethnicities have these features in common. A primary Logan example is General John A. Logan (not our relation) who was often said to have “Indian features.” We know when his ancestors arrived in this country and there was no chance, in that interlude, for there to have been Native American ancestry.

While we would be proud to claim Cherokee ancestry, DNA and the “paper trail” don’t lead us down that genealogical path. Nevertheless, these documents are interesting for their historical and genealogical value. Note Drury Logan’s children (second document below).

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The following page lists Drury Logan, his age, his children, and their ages. His spouse, Addie Russell Logan, isn’t listed because she was neither claiming nor eligible for membership in the Cherokee Nation. Drury Logan’s children are: Melvin Logan, 14; Calvin Logan, 12; Harmon Logan, 10; Jim Logan, 7; Joe Logan, 5; and twins Ray and Roy Logan, 1.

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Charity Logan Andrews’ application for membership in the Cherokee Nation, Dawes Commission, 1896

Several members of our Logan family claimed Cherokee citizenship “by blood” through their descent from either Zachariah Logan or Washington Logan (Euclid Washington Logan or E.W. Logan). William Logan, son of Zachariah Logan, was among them. Here,  below, he is attesting to Charity Logan Andrews’ eligibility for Cherokee citizenship through her father Washington Logan via his father, Robert (S.) Logan. Zachariah Logan and Robert S. Logan were sons of Joseph Logan and Anna “Annie” Bias Logan. The commission set up to make these eligibility determinations was the Dawes Commission.

All of our Logan applicants were denied membership in the Cherokee Nation. It should be noted that, before DNA analysis and more exacting genealogical research methodology, people often were said to have “Indian blood” if they had so-called Native American features, e.g. high cheekbones, dark hair, and dark skin. Sometimes these clues led to tribal ancestry; more often, they did not. Many people from many ethnicities have these features in common. A primary Logan example is General John A. Logan (not our relative) who was often said to have “Indian features.” Well, we know when his ancestors arrived in this country and there was no chance, in that brief interlude, for there to have been Native American ancestry.

While we would be proud to claim Cherokee ancestry, DNA and the “paper trail” don’t lead us down that genealogical path. Nonetheless, these Dawes Commission documents are interesting for their historical and genealogical value. Charity Logan Andrews’ application “claims her right to citizenship in [the Cherokee Nation] together with the rights of her children.” Their names and ages are: Carrie Andrews, 16; Leanora Andrews, 14; and Jessie Andrews, 11.

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