Drury Logan and Sarah Ann Lyons Logan’s children: a bit more information

In the “Register of Baptisms in Unity R.P. [Reformed Presbyterian] Church,” we find Sarah Elizabeth Logan, daughter of Sarah A. Logan, baptized 9 May 1853.

James Harvey Logan, son of Drury and “Sara” A. Logan, was baptized 24 October 1853.

In addition to learning the dates of baptism and to which church Sarah Ann belonged at the time, this is the first record we’ve found of the children’s middle names.

James H. Logan died 13 March 1855. He was 1 year, 1 month, and 2 days old.

Sarah E. Logan married Robert Given or Givens. She was born 27 August 1845 “at Marissa,” St. Clair County, Illinois. She died in Weldon, DeWitt County, Illinois, 9 or 10 August 1913.

What makes these baptisms more poignant is that three other children of Drury and Sarah Ann Lyons Logan had already died: Jane A. Logan died 11 December 1851, 9 years and 3 months old. Robert Logan and Joseph Logan died days apart in 1852. The four Logan siblings lie buried in a row in Old Salem Cemetery in Washington County, Illinois.

In a “List of Members Recorded Into Unity Reformed Presbyterian Church,” Sarah A. Logan became a member 20 April 1853.

Source for “Register of Baptisms in Unity R.P. Church” and “List of Members Recorded Into Unity Reformed Presbyterian Church”: “Old” Bethel Reformed Presbyterian Church 1820…. Eden / Sparta, Illinois, compiled by Jane Boyd, Randolph County [Illinois] Genealogical Society.

 

 

The Name’s the Thing

In Albion’s Seed — Four British Folkways in America by David Hackett Fischer, Fischer makes the point that the naming of backcountry children in America (which includes the areas where our Logans lived) was unlike anywhere else in the colonies at the time. “The onomastic customs of these people were unique.” He cites George R. Stewart’s work, American Given Names, to point out the ten most-popular names on backcountry militia lists around 1776. These will look familiar to those of us researching William Logan (1008) and affiliated family branches:

  • John
  • William
  • James
  • Patrick
  • Robert
  • Thomas
  • Charles
  • Samuel
  • Edward
  • Joseph

 

Some Byars information, Warren County, Tennessee

One of the intriguing places where Byars families — a name closely allied with our Logans — is found is Warren County, Tennessee. We also find numerous Cantrells there. Some of the Cantrell family were affiliated with pioneer Baptist preacher John Hightower in South Carolina, then Hightower and several Cantrells moved to Warren and Logan County, Kentucky, where Hightower worked with Baptist ministers Joseph Logan and Alexander Devin. Later still, some of these SC-KY Cantrells moved to Warren County, Tennessee.

There was a branch of the Dodsons in Warren County, TN, too. The Charles Dodson family, which moved to Warren County, Kentucky (part of which later became Allen County) from South Carolina, as did the Logans. The Dodsons and Logans intermarried in south-central Kentucky and were co-religionists as well as neighbors and friends.

As you can see, I haven’t been able to sort out all these Warren County, Tennessee, threads yet. Is there something to all this or was Warren County, Tennessee, simply an attractive pass-through area and these are coincidental occurrences?

In searching for information, I found the following tidbit in The Dodson Family of Warren County, Tennessee and Allied Families by Catherine Gaffin Lynn. If any of you have done some Logan or Byas/Bias/Byars/Byers work on Warren County, Tennessee, and the tangle of migrations and families, please let us know. We’d be happy to post it. There is additional information in Logan Connections on Nathan Byars, Cantrells, Delphy Logan Byars, Bethells, and more.

James Dodson Evans (Big Jim) m. Dec. 7, 1852 to Drucillah H. Byars b. Oct. 28, 1835 d. March 19, 1909, dau. of Nathan Byars b. Dec. 27, 1808 d. Jan. 12, 1894 and Nancy Hand Byars b. Mar. 12, 1812 d. Sept. 9, 1887. They had 7 children who are listed in Lynn’s book.

I didn’t find any Logans listed in Lynn’s book.

Ragland v. Ragland lawsuit, either Washington or Perry County, Illinois, 1872

This abstract from a Sparta, Randolph County, Illinois newspaper about a Ragland v. Ragland lawsuit contains helpful genealogical information. Washington County, Illinois, is mentioned but some of the Raglands lived in Perry County, Illinois (close to the Perry-Washington County boundary in both cases.) It wasn’t clear from the clipping in which county the lawsuit was filed.

Benjamin Ragland and Nancy, his wife, John Ragland and Patsy, his wife, Elijah Harris and Patsy, his wife, Allen Williams and Catherine, his wife, William Rainey and Harriett, his wife, Hawkins Ragland and Lucinda, his wife, Samuel S. Maxwell and Serilla, his wife, heirs of John Ragland, late of Washington County, deceased.

vs.

Moses Jackson, in right of his wife, Nancy, deceased [Jackson children all named], Rebecca Ragland, wife of Joseph T. Ragland, deceased, Briant West and Ruth, his wife, Elizabeth W. Ragland, John Ff. Maxwell and Emily Frances, his wife, Wm. F. Maxwell and Catherine, his wife, George W. Ragland, Zachariah B. Ragland, John L. Ragland, and Hawkins Ragland, heirs of Joseph T. Ragland, deceased.

The Logans and Raglands are connected this way: Nancy Dodson, daughter of Dillingham Dodson and Mahala Logan Dodson, married Benjamin Ragland in Allen County, Kentucky. Mahala Logan was the daughter of Joseph Logan and Anna “Annie” Bias Logan and the sister of Zachariah Logan.

Nancy Dodson Ragland and Benjamin Ragland had a son named Dillingham Ragland. He married Ruth A. Maxwell in Washington County, Illinois. Their son, Benjamin Ragland, mentioned above, was born in Washington County, IL.

Source: “Abstracts from Sparta, Illinois Newspapers,” Branching Out from St. Clair County, Illinois, Volumes 22-24, Marissa Historical and Genealogical Society, Marissa, St. Clair County, Illinois, 1994

“A Bill to Bring Traitors to Trial,” North Carolina, 1782

The Revolutionary War was a civil war, too, especially in the upcountry of North and South Carolina. In 1782, the North Carolina legislature prepared “A Bill to Bring Traitors to Trial.” Among the names of Loyalists branded as traitors is one with Logan ties, Moses Moore (“Moor” in the document), and his son, Benj. Moore (“Moor”).

Despite being one of the signers of the Tryon Resolves in Tryon County, North Carolina, in 1775, Moses Moore ultimately threw in his lot with King and country. In his mind, of course, he was a patriot.

His son, John Moore, was a Loyalist (Tory) leader at the Battle of Ramsour’s Mill.

A daughter, Sarah Moore, married Drury Logan. Another daughter, Hester, married Joshua Roberts. Both Drury Logan and Joshua Roberts chose the other side in the Revolution: the Patriot (Whig) side. Much of the Drury Logan profile in Logan Connections consists of his and Joshua Roberts’ efforts (as well as Joseph Lawrence who married Moses Moore’s other daughter, Ann) to work and litigate to protect their father-in-law’s land and other assets from confiscation. This was no doubt a sometimes unpopular path to tread, but Logan and Roberts’ bona fides as Patriots made their efforts acceptable to some at least, but most importantly, acceptable in the eyes of the law.

Benj. Moore, the other “Moor” named in the bill as a traitor, was Moses Moore’s son. We don’t know much about him, but he was said to be dead by 1785.

The Moores were two of the 36 men charged with Revolutionary War treason in Rutherford County, North Carolina, alone.

The Treaty of Paris, which ended the Revolutionary War, also ended confiscation of Loyalist land and property. At that point, the North Carolina legislature passed “An Act of Pardon and Oblivion.”

Moses Moore ended up a refugee in Spanish West Florida, a haven for Loyalists originally engineered by the British King in what was then British West Florida.

Among the other “traitors” singled out from Rutherford County, North Carolina, who have a connection, although tangential, with some of our Logans are the Bickerstaff or Biggerstaff family. The Biggerstaffs, like the four Logan brothers, William, Joseph, John, and Thomas, were a family with split loyalties who fought at the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1780. The “Bickerstaffs” named in “A Bill to Bring Traitors to Trial” in 1782 were Samuel, Aaron, and Benjamin. Aaron Biggerstaff, a Tory, fought at Kings Mountain. He was said to be mortally wounded, yet his name is on the list of “traitors.” Benjamin Biggerstaff was a Whig / Patriot, by many accounts, yet family tradition has him switching sides during the war as many did, depending on the fortunes of war and their and their families’ best interest. I believe Samuel Biggerstaff was the father — and a Tory.

In a further example of tangled loyalties, John Moore, Tory commander at Ramsour’s Mill and Moses Moore’s son, was a cousin of the Biggerstaffs.

When the Patriots left Kings Mountain after their stunning victory, Loyalist prisoners in tow, they stopped at the Biggerstaff plantation for a drumhead trial of alleged traitors captured at the battle. The selection of the Biggerstaff location was probably not coincidental. Several Loyalists were hanged there before the summary executions were stopped. It’s possible that some or all of the Logan brothers, except Thomas left wounded on the battlefield, witnessed these hangings.

Our thanks to Joe Logan and Dr. A.B. Pruitt for background sources and information.

Sources: Abstracts of Sales of Confiscated Loyalists Land and Property in North Carolina, Dr. A.B. Pruitt, 1989; “A Bill to Bring Traitors to Trial, 1782,” Grace W. Turner, The North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Vol. XXVIII, No. 4, Nov. 2002, pages 420-426, researched by Joe Logan.

 

History Thought of the Day: Revolutionary War

Drury Logan served in the Revolutionary War as did the four Logan brothers, William, Joseph, John, and Thomas. But in backcountry North and South Carolina, where our Logans lived, the war didn’t affect only soldiers and militia. Women and children were impacted as well — by destruction of crops,  livestock, farms, and houses; terror and intimidation; split families, communities, and churches; fleeing as refugees; and, occasionally, torture, wounds, and death. Here’s some “big picture” information about the Revolutionary War:

  • “The dislocated proportion of the American population exceeded that of the French in their revolution.”
  • The economic decline in the U.S. after the Revolutionary war lasted fifteen years. It was “a crisis unmatched until the Great Depression of the 1930s.”
  • “Patriots … kept one-fifth of Americans enslaved.”
  • After the Revolutionary War, “60,000 dispossessed Loyalists became refugees.”
  • “During the revolution, Americans suffered more upheaval than any other American generation, save that which experienced the Civil War of 1861 to 1865.”

Source: American Revolutions — A Continental History, 1750-1804, Alan Taylor, 2016

Affidavit by William Logan, Cherokee County, Kansas, for Cherokee Nation citizenship for Benjamin B. Logan, 1896

Benjamin B. Logan was the son of Euclid Washington Logan and Queen Della or Queendella/Queendilla Benedict Logan. He was born around 1839 in Allen County, Kentucky. He was named for his grandfather, Benjamin Benedict. E.W. Logan and Q.D. Benedict Logan came from Allen County, Kentucky, to Perry County, Illinois, where they lived for many years. They then moved to the area on the border of Bates County and Henry County, Missouri.

In this document, Benjamin B. Logan is applying for membership into the Cherokee Nation. William Logan is vouching for his application. William Logan was the son of Zachariah Logan and Margaret “Peggy” Brown Logan. Zachariah Logan was Robert S. Logan’s brother.

One of the most interesting things about this affidavit is that it spells out Benjamin B. Logan’s lineage as follows: “… son of EW Logan who was a son of Robert Logan [Robert S. Logan of Allen County, KY] who was a son of Joseph Logan.” William Logan was 83 at the time. He made his mark, being unable to write his name.

The Dawes Commission Rolls of 1835 and 1838 are referenced, as was protocol for these applications.

It is important to note that, although numerous Logans of our line applied for Cherokee citizenship, all were denied for insufficient proof.

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GUY members of Trammel Fork Baptist Church, Allen County, Kentucky, 1850-1902 (with Logan and Dodson notes)

The following information was researched by David C. Smith of Pembroke, Kentucky, and compiled as “Minutes of the Trammel Fork Baptist Church 1819-1994, Allen County, Kentucky.” It is posted on the Allen County, Kentucky, genealogy website: http://www.allencountyky.com

The first 15 years of Trammel Fork Baptist Church history are missing. Author David C. Smith breaks the membership down by clusters of years. This doesn’t mean someone was a member for the full time; rather, that their period of membership falls within that particular time frame. Items in parentheses are from Smith; items in brackets from Jones.

  • Amanda M. Guy, 1870-1889 — [Note: Amanda M. Logan, daughter of Robert S. Logan and Rebecca T. Dodson Logan, married Vincent (Vinson) Guy, son of Samuel Guy and Nancy Hinton Guy.]
  • Anna Guy, 1870-1889, 1890-1902 (notation: now Briley)
  • C.J. Guy, 1890-1902
  • Charles P. Guy, 1870-1889, 1890-1902
  • Cora M. Guy, 1890-1902
  • Comelia M. Guy, 1890-1902
  • Elizabeth Guy, 1890-1902, died 2/13/1891
  • Emily A. Guy, 1870-1889 (notation: now Dodson/discharged by letter) [Note: Emily “Belle” A. Guy married Lewis McKendry “Mac” Dodson, son of Joseph Logan Dodson and Mahala Reader or Reeder Lovell. Joseph Logan Dodson was the son of Dillingham Dodson and Mahala Logan Dodson. He was named for pioneer Baptist minister, Joseph Logan, Mahala Logan’s father.]
  • Harry C. Guy, 1890-1902
  • Herschell G. Guy, 1890-1902
  • John E. Guy, 1850-1869 (notation: died 1860) [Note: John E. Guy was the son of Mathias or Mathis Guy and Mariah Duncan Guy.]
  • Lady Guy (1), 1890-1902 (notation: now Harmon, dead)
  • Lady Guy (2), 1890-1902 (notation: now Meredith)
  • M.J. Guy, 1890-1902 (notation: died 10/1896)
  • Martha J. Guy, 1870-1889
  • Mary C. Guy, 1890-1902 (notation: now Cooksey)
  • Merty Guy, 1890-1902 (notation: died 1902)
  • Minnie B. Guy, 1890-1902
  • O.S. Guy, 1890-1902
  • Olivia Guy, 1870-1889, 1890-1902 (notation: now Cushenberry)
  • Ollie B. Guy, 1890-1902 (notation: now Pearson)
  • Otie/Ota Guy, 1870-1889, 1890-1902 (notation: now Patton, died 1902)
  • Proctor Guy, 1890-1902
  • R.E. Guy, 1890-1902
  • Rebecca F. Guy, 1850-1869 (notation: discharged by letter)
  • Robert Guy, 1890-1902 (notation: died 1907)
  • Robert S. Guy, 1870-1889 (notation: excluded 9/6/1884) [Note: Son of Amanda M. Logan Guy and Vincent/Vinson Guy.]
  • Sidney N. Guy, 1850-1869 (notation: died 8/10/1860)
  • Susan J. Guy, 1870-1889, 1890-1902 (notation: now Pruitt, died 1899)
  • Toy Guy, 1890-1902 (notation: now Griffin)
  • V.A. Guy, 1890-1902
  • Vinson Guy, 1870-1889 — [Note: Spouse of Amanda M. Logan Guy. Please see above.]
  • William E. Guy, 1870-1889 (notation: excluded 1/6/1877)
  • Wm. W. Guy, 1870-1889

Logan mysteries, enigmas, conundrums, and brick walls

DNA analysis has taken us farther back in time while simultaneously bringing our Logan lines closer together. Paper and digital searches continue apace. Yet, despite decades of searching by many people, we still have several major unsolved Logan genealogical puzzles. Here are a few:

  1. How do the four major Logan lines connect and where? Who is the common ancestor?
  2. Who is (are) the immigrant ancestor(s)? When did he/she arrive in the colonies? Might it have been William Logan of Spotsylvania County, Virginia? Or, perhaps his parent or parents?
  3. How does Margaret Logan of old Rappahannock County, Virginia, connect with our Logans? Or does she?
  4. Who was William Logan’s spouse? (A spouse is cited in certain DAR submissions, but I’m uncertain of the source or proof. Perhaps some of you have more information or can clarify.)
  5. Who are the parents of William Logan (Edgefield County, SC), Reuben Logan (TN), and Drury Logan (Halifax County, VA)?

On the Joseph Logan and Anna “Annie” Bias line:

  1. How do all the Bias, Byas, Byers, Byars, Bice, etc. lines fit together? Has anyone been able to sort this out?
  2. So far, no one has found a marriage record for John Black Logan. Does one exist?
  3. What religion was Zachariah Logan? We assume Baptist because of his father and siblings, but no one (to my knowledge) has found a church record whether in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Tennessee, or Illinois. Is there a reason we haven’t?

There are dozens more Logan riddles, great and small. Please feel free to add them to this list and/or comment.